Has your work begun to seem incredibly boring or stressful? It might be time to quit your job. Starting over again can seem like a scary or depressing proposition.

Sometimes your current salary is actually pretty good, or you’ve made some close friendships with co-workers.

But if you’re truly unhappy with your job, staying will only make you feel worse. Here are some good indicators that it’s time to move on and leave your job.

1) You complain about your job. 

If you find that you’re frequently griping about your boss, your duties, your commute, or anything else job-related, you’re getting stressed and frustrated. These negative feelings will only build up until you lash out at someone or wind up bitter and miserable. If you can’t find a way to change the situation, start looking for something new.


2) You often think about seeking new opportunities. 

Maybe the pay isn’t so great, or you’re simply tired of an exhausting routine. Repeated feelings of being over-stressed on the job are reported by 26 percent of workers. You may have been passed over for promotion one time too many, or constantly have to correct someone else’s mistakes. If you keep telling yourself it might be a good idea to look for a change of employment, it probably is. 


3) You’ve become less productive. 

Perhaps when you first started at your job, you were a go-getter who wanted to do well and climb the ladder. That can actually be a bad move in some circumstances. For instance, you may have taken on the responsibilities of an office administrator, but aren’t getting the salary or the appreciation to make it worthwhile. If you’ve lost interest and motivation, you might want to think about finding work that’s more rewarding to you.  


4) You’re losing sleep. 

At times you may be unable to get to sleep at night because you’re stressing over something that happened, or will happen, at work. But you’re still obliged to climb out of bed half-groggy when the alarm clock goes off and face another tedious day without your full energy and focus. If this is a frequent situation, you might want to start a job search


5) You dream about retirement or vacation. 

When you’re day-dreaming about being anywhere besides at your job, it’s a sign of discontent. Most of us indulge our imaginations now and then, but when you’re often dreaming about getaways or retirement that are still months or years in the future, you need to find an environment that’s more fulfilling.


6) You need a coping mechanism. 

A distraction to help you handle your job anxiety can be negative, as the consumption of drugs or alcohol, or it can be positive, such as taking up a hobby or joining a softball league. Establishing a work-life balance

is important, but if your job has become a trial that you need to recuperate from, it’s unhealthy mentally and physically.


7) Your health is suffering. 

It’s well known that stress is bad for health. It can lead to headaches, high blood pressure, poor digestion, and lowered immune responses that make you more vulnerable to sickness. You may tell yourself that you’re coping with job stress, but if you’re deteriorating physically, it’s time to quit your job and put your resume out there. 


8) Your diet has changed. 

Anxiety often manifests in our eating habits. In some cases, people lose their appetite because they’re so fretful about work that they don’t take the time to sit down and enjoy a good meal. For some people, over-indulging is the way to cope with stress. This can be a form of addictive behavior as surely as alcoholism. If you’re experiencing significant changes in body weight because of job stress, start looking for new employment. 


9) You dread going to work. 

Everyone likes to sleep in now and then. Not many people have the luxury of an occupation they enjoy. But if you constantly or frequently dread going to work at all, you most likely hate your job. Over 50 percent of employees show up late on Monday mornings, but if the thought of another workweek is at all traumatic, it’s time for a change. 


10) You’ve become more irritable. 

When you’ve become the “difficult” employee that’s frequently arguing, or being avoided by your associates, the stress has gotten to you. You might want to start a job search before the tension boils over and you say or do something that gets you in trouble. This could seriously impact your job prospects and your future. 



Work-Life Stress 

Of course, there could be other things that are making you unhappy, and those negative emotions are simply spilling over into what is otherwise a satisfactory job. If marriage, health, or other troubles have turned your life upside down, you need to get help and get them under control. 

But if it’s your job situation that’s changed, think about your career. How is it different than it was a year or five years ago? Do you remember a time when you were happier there?

Ask yourself where it went wrong, and whether there is a possibility of fixing it, such as moving to a different department or training for new skills.

If you don’t have answers or solutions that will renew your passion for your work, then you’ve most likely come to a dead-end at that particular company. It’s time to strike out and find something more suited to your interests and talents. 

What Happens Next 

Once you’ve made the decision to look for a fresh start, polish up your resume and start checking the job boards. When you land another interview, don’t say negative things about your latest company or boss, no matter how unhappy you were with them. It’s better to explain that you simply weren’t being challenged. 

You might feel a lot better just to be looking. The hope of positive change will make it easier to quit your job and get your career moving again.

Written By
Barret Selby is a career coach focused on helping people make the right decisions for their career paths. He started as a recruiter and moved on to this career because he felt he could grow professionally and do more for individuals in need of career advice

Related Post

Human Resources Today