Getting laid off is rough. If you’re one of the unlucky ones who experience this during your career, know that you’re not alone. Almost one-third of stable workers get laid off before they turn 50, and it’s never easy. You know you need to handle the situation professionally, but it’s all too easy to get emotional about being suddenly let go.

First off, remember that getting laid off isn’t the same thing as getting fired. You can take pride in knowing that your performance wasn’t the problem. When a company needs to cut costs or downsize, laying employees off is strictly a business move. It’s about bottom lines and numbers. Chances are, others who are just as talented and hard-working as you got the bad news too. Remember not to feel targeted or attacked — it’s just business.

It’s easy to go into a downward spiral after getting let go. But the next step is maintaining a positive outlook. Instead of viewing this as your career crashing and burning, think of it as an opportunity to open new doors and explore new options. Get in touch with a professional network or a recruiter. Update your Linkedin profile and resume to reflect the hard-working professional you know you are.

Next, decide when you want to re-enter the workforce. If you have wiggle room in your budget, this may be a great opportunity to get away for a much needed vacation without having to take time off from a job. You could even take a long weekend and practice some self-care. Make sure you’re looking after yourself in this limbo period, whatever that looks like for you personally.

Remember not to hide your layoff from family and friends. Chances are they’ve been through similar situations and can offer valuable advice. Bottling in your feelings and frustrations isn’t a healthy way to go through life. It’s okay to rely on the support of others during career troubles.

If work in your particular field is hard to find, consider part-time work or freelancing while you look for something more permanent. Not only will it keep you busy and bulk up your resume, but it can supplement your income until you get a more steady salary. In today’s gig economy, there are plenty of options to make sure you stay busy and positive.

By staying positive, focusing on new opportunities, and reaching out to others for advice, you’ll bounce back from being laid off and be back in the workforce in no time. This infographic from Turbo makes it easy.

Written By
Karlie Kramer writes on behalf of Turbo with an interest in workplace culture. Specifically, she writes on how people can excel in their careers through maximizing productivity and having a positive mindset. Her most recent piece covers 12 ways to bounce back from being laid off.