It takes a while to establish the proper etiquette for any new communications technology.

The inventor of the telephone, Alexander Graham Bell, originally believed people should answer the phone by saying “Ahoy-hoy.” That didn’t take, obviously, but it took some time and practice until answering the phone with “hello” became standard.

It’s the same today with teleconferencing, which has become an increasingly common element of many modern offices.

As more businesses adapt to high-speed Internet and open their offices to include more flexibility, video conferencing has become a viable alternative to telephone conferencing or meeting in person.

When compared to the cost of travel, video conferencing can be a more cost-effective alternative.

However, new technology always comes with some confusion about how best to utilize it. Although video conferencing can make meetings more convenient, they also can give others a bad impression.

For example, participating in video conferencing from home can lead to interruptions from children or pets. Improper lighting or camera placement can give everyone a view of a dark room or someone’s forehead.

Excessive background noise on your end of the video conference can be distracting and annoying for the other participants. These are all factors that most professionals may not be thinking about yet, but should become part of standard video conferencing etiquette.

Below are some tips for video conferencing etiquette you should follow to appear professional at all times.

Video conferencing is a relatively new technology, but appears to be here to stay. Make sure you know how to use it like a pro.

7 Videoconferencing Etiquette for Effective Meetings

Infographic Credit – mclabs.com

Written By
Hugh McCullen is President of MicroTek, a company that offers training and meeting solutions. He is responsible for expanding the company’s customer services portfolio and global presence. He strives to position MicroTek as a trusted partner, focusing on providing speed and flexibility for choosing training facilities, meeting and event management to help customers evolve non-core services into strategic assets.

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